Real reasons injury happens in CrossFit (hint: it’s not CrossFit)

21
Mar

Real reasons injury happens in CrossFit (hint: it’s not CrossFit)

We get it often: “I heard you could get hurt doing CrossFit.”

It’s true, CrossFit could cause injury.

But, saying CrossFit is dangerous because it causes injury is like saying a spoon is dangerous because it makes you fat. An item or action simply exists. It is the improper applied application which makes it safe or dangerous.

So how can we make sure we are correctly applying CrossFit to prevent injury?

Listen to CrossFit methodology
The true essence of CrossFit is not to pull heavy weight or see how fast we can complete a workout. Instead, CrossFit teaches functional movement done to mechanical standards before weight or intensity are introduced. Mechanics, then consistency in the movement, and finally, intensity. In order, always. We must master our movements first to prevent injury.

Listen to the coach
Despite paying for personal group training, we often neglect the instruction of a coach. No matter how seasoned we are, it is inherent to watch as he/she demonstrates proper movement and tips before the WOD. It is also to our benefit to heed advice during the strength and metcon portion. All of Badger’s coaches are CrossFit L1-certified (many in more specific categories like Gymnastics and Endurance). They are the experts, they know best. They are here to guide and help. That’s what we pay for.

Listen to our bodies
We are all built different and need to accept our uniqueness when it comes to lifting or performing movements. We need to load the bar with realistic weight so our form doesn’t slip and we get hurt just trying to stick the lift.

Also, if we do have an ailment (muscle fatigue, the flu coming on, a sore joint, past mobility issues), we need to step back from our ego and be honest with our condition. If we deem it as “not that bad” or fight through it because it’s PR week, our condition likely worsens and worsens to the point of pain — sometimes so bad, we have to stop altogether.

So if we find ourselves injured, instead of pointing the finger at the action (CrossFit), we need to examine our own usage and make sure we are listening.